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Dr Adam Kirrander

Dr Adam Kirrander
Chancellor's Fellow
Room 261

School of Chemistry
Joseph Black Building
West Mains Road
Edinburgh
EH9 3JJ

0131 650 4716

Research Interests: 
Quantum dynamics of atoms and molecules, theoretical spectroscopy, impact of new light-sources on chemistry (ultrafast dynamics, coherent control, time-resolved x-ray diffraction)

My research in theoretical chemical physics includes time-resolved dynamics and spectroscopy, and links to interdisciplinary fields such as modelling and simulations, as well as energy, atmospheric and space science. I work with experimentalists to explain and analyse results, propose new experiments, and develop theory and computational methods for quantum dynamics in molecules.

To a large extent, my work is motivated by the opportunities provided by new light-sources, such as ultrafast lasers and free-electron x-ray lasers. Examples from my own work include:

  • ultrafast dynamics of molecules, atoms and electrons
  • coherent control – using light to control chemistry
  • time-resolved x-ray diffraction and 'molecular movies'
  • high-resolution spectroscopy and precise measurements

Ultimately, these advances will allow sophisticated understanding, manipulation, and design of molecules, molecular properties and atomic level processes. To reach this goal, we need to develop theoretical and computational methods that can correctly describe quantum dynamics, i.e. which describe how the nuclei and electrons move together during a chemical process. Such methods bridge the gap between traditional molecular dynamics (what are the atoms doing?) and quantum chemistry (what are the electrons doing?).

Publications: 

Molecular ion pair states in ungerade H2, Kirrander, Jungen, Phys. Rev. A 84, 052512 (2011)

Quantum dynamics with fermion coupled coherent states: Theory and application to electron dynamics in laser fields, Kirrander, Shalashilin, Phys. Rev. A, 84, 033406 (2011)

Communication: Heavy Rydberg states: The H+H- system, Kirrander, J. Chem. Phys., 133, 121103 (2010) (Editor’s Choice for 2010 in Journal of Chemical Physics)